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THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE PARTNERSHIP IN 2014

THE PARTNERSHIP'S CONTRIBUTION TO EMPLOYMENT

The Partnership’s contribution to employment can also be estimated at three levels: the direct contribution, the supply chain spend contribution (indirect), and the employee spend contribution (induced) as shown in Figure 13. PwC has estimated the supply chain and employee spend contributions to employment using the same model of Botswana’s economy as the one used to estimate the impact on GDP (see Appendix 1 for more details on the methodology used).

In total, the Partnership supported 34,160 jobs in the economy in 2014. This means that one in every 20 jobs in Botswana is linked to the activities of the Partnership.

 

FIGURE 13: THE PARTNERSHIP’S CONTRIBUTION TO JOBS

FIGURE 13: THE PARTNERSHIP’S CONTRIBUTION TO JOBS

DIRECT CONTRIBUTION TO EMPLOYMENT

In 2014, the Partnership directly employed almost 8,000 people in Botswana, including nearly 2,000 contractors. The split between the different parts of the Partnership is shown in Figure 14. The Partnership’s direct employment represented two per cent of formal employment in Botswana, and four per cent of formal non-government employment in 2014.36 Of these employees, 96 per cent of the workforce and 85 per cent of the management were Botswana citizens.

SUPPLY CHAIN AND EMPLOYEE SPEND CONTRIBUTION TO EMPLOYMENT

Beyond those directly employed by the Partnership, 12,870 jobs were supported in the rest of the economy by the spending of the Partnership with local suppliers. This includes nearly 4,250 outsourced contractors who worked for the Partnership in 2014. Most of these jobs were generated in the manufacturing sector, as a large percentage of the value of the Partnership’s purchases are manufactured goods.

Spending of the wages and salaries of the employees of the Partnership and of its suppliers’ employees supported a further 13,360 jobs. Most were in the wholesale and retail sector (which includes hotels and restaurants), reflecting employees’ spending on retail trade goods such as food. Employee spending also supported a significant number of jobs in the banking, financial, social and personal services sectors. This reflects the strong links with the trade sector.

Tebogo Kwtuso is a trainee Mining Engineer working at Orapa Mine.

Tebogo Kwtuso is a trainee Mining Engineer working at Orapa Mine.

36 Based on estimates of formal employment in 2014. Formal employment data is only available from Statistics Botswana until 2012. Formal employment is taken from the Bank of Botswana and excludes working proprietors, unpaid family workers and small businesses with fewer than five employees.